Author Talk & Book Signing – Kathleen Grissom

03/12/17 02:00 PM - 03/12/17 04:00 PM
C. Burr Artz Public Library - Community Room
110 East Patrick Street, Frederick, MD, United States

Kathleen Grissom wowed critics and readers alike with her first novel, The Kitchen House. Fans connected so deeply to the book’s characters that the author found herself being asked over and over “what happens next?” She answers that question with Glory Over Everything.

This heart-racing story begins in 1830 Philadelphia with Jamie Pyke, son of both a slave and a master of Tall Oakes, the Virginian plantation he once called home. Jamie is passing in polite society as a wealthy white silversmith, but when his beloved servant Pan is captured and sold into slavery in the South, he agrees to help–even though his journey will take him perilously close to the ruthless slave hunter still searching for him.

This event is presented in partnership with Frederick County Public Libraries, as part of FCPL’s Women’s History Month celebration, and the African American Resources, Cultural Heritage Society (AARCH). Q&A and book signing will follow author presentation. Books will be available for purchase and signing at event.

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